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View our growing list of links to personal blogs, organizations, resources, tools and videos dealing with emotional sensitivity and borderline personality disorder.

Some of the characteristics to consider if you think you might be an emotionally sensitive person.

Links to books we've reviewed that can help those understand and identify with borderline personality disorder and emotion sensitivity.


Proposal for Funding Dealing With Emotions

PROPOSAL FOR FUNDING DEALING WITH EMOTIONS
A PEER TO PEER SUPPORT GROUP FOR PEOPLE IN RECOVERY WITH MENTAL ILLNESS
SEEKING EDUCATION/SUPPORT FOR EMOTION REGULATION SKILLS

WHO
The Recovery Resource Committee of the National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder (NEA-BPD) has created an educational video series on “Dealing With Emotions” for a proposed weekly free peer-to-peer support group program. The program would be appropriate for those with any diagnosis seeking facilitated discussion on emotion regulation skills.

TARGET AUDIENCE
The program will provide practical, research-based information for individuals struggling with emotion management. The program will be designed to target a wide range of diagnoses such as anxiety, depression, mood and personality disorders, and will appeal to a broad age range. Nationwide coverage is the goal.

FACILITATORS
Two expert providers of Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Dr. Shari Manning and Dr. Karyn Hall (Treatment Implementation Collaborative) will create and moderate the programs in the series accompanied by two peers.

WHAT
“Dealing with Emotions” will consist of eight half-hour lessons with role playing and examples.
A downloadable discussion guide for trained peer facilitators will accompany the series. Each program in the eight week series will include a halfhour video lesson in DVD format or streaming video over the internet. The video lessons will be followed by a peer-led, one-hour
discussion based on the outline contained in the accompanying guide.

Lesson topics include:
1. Knowing your emotions.
2. Validating your emotions and those of others.
3. Controlling your emotions.
4. Making yourself less susceptible to emotions.
5. Problem-solving painful situations.
6. Tolerating painful situations and emotions.
7. Bringing down emotions by stopping judgment.
8. Changing emotions when you want to.

WHY
1. Many mental illnesses have a core symptom of poorly regulated emotions.
2. Therapy programs that teach emotion regulation skills are difficult to find and unaffordable for many.
3. Peers benefit from reliable, weekly, human connections to discourage isolation.
4. Substantive peer support groups are more rewarding and successful than unstructured support groups dealing with individual problems.
5. Peers in recovery benefit from the teaching experience as they reconnect to community and reinforce their own skills.
6. Peer teaching is powerful.

WHEN & WHERE
Videotaping is scheduled in Houston, Texas, on receipt of funding. One day of program planning will be followed by two days of in-studio video production and editing by the MD Anderson Cancer Center — University of Texas Production Division.

HOW YOU CAN HELP
The cost for developing the curriculum and discussion guide, lodging, travel and expenses for two professionals and two peers is approximately $17,000. UTMD Anderson Production Studios cost for filming and editing, approximately $11,000. Administrative expenses will be approximately $2,000.

TOTAL $30,000.

NEA-BPD, a 501c3 non-profit agency will receive and distribute funds. As terms of the funder are satisfied, NEABPD will have ownership of the project for free-to-the-public viewing. The lessons may be used for education/support groups or independent study. A detailed description of the “Dealing With Emotions” project is available.

CONTACT
Please contact Diane and Jim Hall
Family Educators for NAMI and NEA-BPD,
dwe@neabpd.com
www.borderlinepersonalitydisorder.com




About The Recovery Resources Committee of NEA

Focusing on individuals in recovery with symptoms of BPD, a committee of four individuals in recovery and one professional has formed the Recovery Resources committee of NEA-BPD.  The committee has three goals:  One, the creation of a Recovery Resources column on the NEA.BPD website;  Two, posting the www.dealingwithemotions.org website for individuals working on recovery issues; and Three, creating a peer to peer, free, weekly, education/support curriculum for community mental health outreach.  More information on the support project, Dealing With Emotions, may be found on the Donations link on the www.borderlinepersonalitydisorder.com website.